CONTACT US   |   TERMS AND CONDITIONS
   

" The object of war is not to die for your country but to make the other bastard die for his "   Paton

 
HOME DAGGERS       BAYONETS       SWORDS       KNIVES       HELMETS       MISC / CONSIGN       GALLERY         
      Wardaggers.com - Starting in 1935 German edged weapon manufacturers in and around Solingen where asked to submit German Army Dagger designs to secure production contracts based on a cross-guard pattern drawn up by the renowned artist Paul Casberg, who at the time was working for Carl Eickhorn. The initial patterns submitted by many of the larger firms early in the period where hand finished or chiseled by skilled craftsman and the variety of base metals, coatings and general eagle cross-guard designs submitted was widespread and varied.
 This time consuming process of hand finishing and the costs involved with using superior materials was not cost effective and once the contracts had been obtained, many firms started to streamline production and to either source parts from other manufacturers or to standardize production with the use of high quality moulds and castings that required limited hand chasing.
This reference page is aimed to show the designs introduced by each German army dagger maker throughout the period and although unique to each individual firm, it should be noted that suppliers and assemblers alike swapped or purchased parts from each other on a regular basis. This page is intended as a guide, the rarity and timeframe assessments should not be used as a definitive resource................
 
 
GENERIC TYPE A   GENERIC TYPE B
UPDATED - 19-01-2014
Loading German dagger, please wait Loading German dagger, please wait
 

( GENERIC A - Similar To : WKC 3rd )   This guard will be seen on the majority of daggers produced by the smaller companies who did not produce their own fitting. It was produced in huge numbers and designed with sharp detailing and simple angles to reduce the need for hand finishing. Notice the step down from the forehead to the beak not observed on the hatchet type head of the WKC eagle on which this cross-guard design was based. It can be found cast in all types of base metals and finishes, from brass based with heavy silver plating to silver washed pot metal and was introduced relatively late in the period and it should not be found on early daggers. ( Pre- 1936/7 ). A few of the smaller companies such as Fridericus, Buchel and Tiger purchased these Generic parts and yet fitted their daggers with additional cost upgrades such as a glass or ivory grip, as well as etched and Damascus blades to set their products apart from other manufacturers.
 Both Generic cross-guards have been convincingly reproduced and all parts of a dagger bearing Generic fittings should be scrutinized in order to determine authenticity.

( GENERIC B - Similar To : Wingen 2nd & Herder )   This eagle was taken from a design by the Wingen company and is observed on daggers by virtually all makers with the exception of the larger companies. Almost identical to the Herder produced cross-guard but with a discreet dip from brow to beak. The three cross-guards are easily confused and it is common for an obviously early production dagger to be described as having this Generic B part, in many cases it will in fact be Herder or Wingen. In the world of German army dagger collecting and especially those who collect by type rather than maker, the Wingen, Herder and Generic "B" type cross-guards are the hardest to differentiate. As with the previous Generic cross-guard this pattern was chosen for ease of casting and limited pre-assembly manual finishing. The beak of the eagle is normally upturned, almost in a snarl type pose, with noticeably larger circular quillions than the Generic A and again can be found in a wide range of base metals and numerous plating techniques. Both Generic type cross-guards should NOT be found matched with a slant grip, the only exception is the maker Christianswerk who used a nickel plated Wingen cross-guard, often confused as being a Generic type "B".
It is important to assess all of the fittings in order to correctly determine the German daggers origin.

RARITY: Common
TIMEFRAME: 1936-1942
RARITY: Common
TIMEFRAME: 1936-1942
 
ALCOSO 1st ALCOSO 2nd
 
Loading German Dagger, please wait Loading German Dagger, please wait
 
( ALCOSO 1st - Similar To : Holler 1st , Plumacher)   Easily distinguished by the "chicken fillet" type legs, squat body of the eagle and the low neck line. This particular pattern from Alcoso bears similarities to the Holler 1st and also the recently recognized cross-guard found on early slant gripped daggers by Plumacher and Axt und Hauerfabrik. The swastika on the early ACS daggers is normally deformed or misshapen, and the beak is round in appearance compared with the squared beak of the Holler 1st.        The body shape and unusual leg enhancements to both the ACS 1st, Plumacher and Holler 1st are very similar however close inspection of the head and wing details are the quickest ways of telling them apart. This cross-guard is normally found matched with fittings of the highest quality and early plating techniques, blades should have a tapered tang and the grip should be the slanted variety, many will also display heavy hand enhancing or chiseling work, sometimes to the extent of confusing indentification.
Alcoso also fixed many of the pommels in place after assembly on all models, so care should be taken when trying to disassemble a dagger that has never been apart.

( ALCOSO 2nd - similar To : None )   This is one of the largest eagles you will find on a German army dagger cross-guard, the overall length coupled with the large wreath / swastika means that the lower edge of the wreath often contacts the upper scabbard band. It is unmistakable in hand and also by design. It has the typical Alcoso sharp angle to the lower wing, the head of the eagle is level with the top of the guard and the head has a sharp down-turned beak. The wing shape is a tell tale sign of Alcoso marked daggers due to the dramatic rise and very pointed wing tips. The later two types utilized by Alcoso are normally matched with the typical flared pommel, easily recognizable as an ACS dagger, the 1st and 2nd styles normally have early 14 leaf pommels. This cross-guard was cast just before standardization was introduced and as such it is normally found with high quality brass based early materials and plating. This 2nd pattern cross-guard is rarely encountered due to the short period it was in production and good detailed examples are hard to find, it is not the prettiest design by far but for sheer proportions Alcoso was making a statement.

 RARITY: Rare
TIMEFRAME: 1935-1936
RARITY: Rare
TIMEFRAME: 1936
 
ALCOSO 3rd ALCOSO 4th
 
Loading German Dagger, please wait Loading German Dagger, please wait
 

( ALCOSO 3rd - Similar To : Eickhorn 1st )   Note the gentle upward curve of the final section of the wing in comparison to the Eickhorn, smaller eye detail, an outward slope to the lower beak and a rounder body to name a few. The 3rd style was prone to wear due to the inferior base metal utilized. Some early Alcoso German army daggers have been observed with cross-guards made of a magnetic base metal, possibly a steel or iron based alloy and may account for the loss of detailing over time. It is believed the base metal was brass coated before receiving its final silver plating and has been observed on the 2nd & 3rd style eagles.

( ALCOSO 4th - Similar To : None )   Commonly referred too as the "Hi-Lift" design or cross-guard from Alcoso, it differs hugely from all other cross-guards manufactured during the period. With a raised profile to the whole eagle and sharp detailing to the head, you are given the impression of an almost 3D like appearance to the eagle. Produced late in the period and from a struggling Jewish owned company, the base metals are normally inferior which normally would equate to a worn a poorly defined cross-guard some 60+ years later. However due to the raised eagle, the majority of daggers bearing this design hold up very well. Note also the raised wing section midway along the upper spline, unique in the world of German army dagger cross-guards. Most will utilize poor base metals and plating techniques due to the timeframe of manufacture and restrictions on resources however quality examples do exist, with good base metals and thick silver plate. An inspirational Art Deco and innovative design that was in production at the same time the founder of the Alcoso company  ( Alexander Coppel ) was interned at Terezin concentration camp.

RARITY: Common
TIMEFRAME: 1936-1940
RARITY: Scarce
TIMEFRAME: 1938-1942
 
EICKHORN 1st EICKHORN 2nd
 
Loading German Dagger, please wait Loading German Dagger, please wait
 

( EICKHORN 1st - Similar To : Eickhorn 2nd )   On all 3 designs by Eickhorn you can visually see the progression of one eagle to the next. This early guard is rarely encountered and although similar to the 2nd design there are differences to the legs, size of the swastika and breast feathering. The quillions are also noticeably thinner. This type was also heavily hand enhanced so variations will exist.
Early examples utilizing the 1st and sometimes the 2nd pattern will occasionally be found with C.E. stamped onto the blade tang, with plated or polished blades. Slant grip German army daggers by Carl Eickhorn are extremely rare. Eickhorn also must have held a large stock of parts throughout production as it is relatively common to find early parts mixed with slightly later dagger configurations.

Courtesy of the V.B collection.

( EICKHORN 2nd - Similar To : Alcoso 3rd & Horster 4th )   Normally seen cast in superior base-metals with fittings to match and silver plated. Similar to Horsters last design but with differences to the cut of the breast feathering and body shape and sharpness to the rear of the head. The second pattern was more widely used on the earlier daggers by Eickhorn, and is sometimes wrongly attributed the title of the type 1.
This Carl Eickhorn cross-guard differs from the 1st in that the swastika has a thinner neater stamped appearance, the inverted "V" between the eagles legs has gone and the wreath is crisper with a much sharper design.

RARITY: Scarce
TIMEFRAME: 1935-1936
RARITY: Common
TIMEFRAME: 1936-1937
 
EICKHORN 3rd EICKHORN 4th
 
Loading German Dagger, please wait Loading German Dagger, please wait
 

( EICKHORN 3rd - Similar To : Eickhorn 2nd )   The head of the previous pattern Eickhorn cross-guard was carried over into the third design but with the addition of a wider stockier body and enhanced breast feathering, again this design was only used for a short period and can be classed as rare.
Note, on this design by Carl Eickhorn the general detailing is normally very crisp and with the higher body and wider pattern to the feathering means it is far less susceptible to wear and tear.

Courtesy of the V.B collection.

( EICKHORN 4th - Similar To : Eickhorn 3rd )   The final design and by far the most numerous, and bears the addition of another head design, added to the body carried over from the previous design. This bird is more commonly known as the type 2, which we now know to be wrong and should in fact be the type 4. The body height has been reduced and is more squat and rounded bringing the eagles head down and central to the upper arms of the eagles wings. The pencil like appearance of the legs has gone and most daggers by Eickhorn with this cross-guard will have the flat scabbard bands and ferrule.

RARITY: Scarce
TIMEFRAME: 1936-1937
RARITY: Common
TIMEFRAME: 1937-1942
 
E-PACK 1st E-PACK 2nd
 
Loading German Dagger, please wait Loading German Dagger, please wait
 

( E-PACK 1st - Similar To : Heller & Henckels )   Early 1st style pack normally observed with thick silvering and brass base material, the head has a unique shape and notice how high the inverted "V" between the eagles legs rises into the body. Commonly seen with heavy hand enhancing and observed on many early German daggers by the smaller cottage manufacturers who purchased their parts from Pack. This pattern was probably the most widely used cross-guard on early German daggers by any maker and although many lack fine detail, it was also one of the most widely used and chiseled or enhanced. Rated as common, it must be said that NO early slant gripped dagger can be classed as prolific due to the limited amount of time that they were in production, however in comparison to other early cross-guards it was hard to rate this one any differently.

( E-PACK 2nd - Similar To : None )   The cross-guard shown above, I believe is a new undocumented variation from E-Pack and was possibly only used for a short time or as a transitional pattern between the Pack 1st and 3rd. It can be found on some early slant grip Pack German army daggers bearing the earliest trademark and differs from E-Packs 1st recognized pattern with differences to the body weave pattern, lower leg feathering, and head shape. The wreath, swastika and wings are almost identical to the Pack 1st.
This cross-guard can also be found on early slant grip German daggers by Spitzer.

RARITY: Common
TIMEFRAME: 1935-1936
RARITY: Rare
TIMEFRAME: 1935-1936
 
E-PACK 3rd E-PACK 4th
 
Loading German Dagger, please wait Loading German Dagger, please wait
 

( E-PACK 3rd - Similar To : Holler 2nd )   Made of lightweight base metal but still observed with hand enhancing late into the period. Very similar to the Holler 2nd who are thought to have purchased from a sub-contractor and modified to suit, there are differences in the wreath work, breast feathering and beak shape. The Holler variation nearly always has a circular punched eye, compared to the highly detailed eye on the Pack. Although this pattern was cast and produced later in the period they can also be found with hand enhancing which is a testament to E-Packs attention to detail and quality of product throughout the period.
A few rare examples of this design have been found in satin aluminium with no evidence of ever being silver plated, this unique finish can sometimes be mistaken on later Pack cross-guards that originally utilized an aluminium base alloy, silver plated, that has been lost to time.

( E-PACK 4th - Similar To : None )   This example by E-Pack was known as a generic type and was used or purchased by several other German dagger makers of aluminium hilted early army daggers. This variety of fittings by one of the most desirable makers, makes the aluminium type dagger the most sought after German army dagger, by advanced army dagger collectors Worldwide. Some later produced army daggers utilizing pot metal or aluminium base metals are sometimes mistaken for this specific type of cross-guard due to the loss or absorption of the silver plating. Originals normally have the typical brushed aluminium appearance and were rarely silver plated although examples do exist.
Similar in design to the 3rd pattern standard Pack cross-guard there are enough differences for it to be considered unique.

Courtesy of the T.K. collection.

RARITY: Common
TIMEFRAME: 1936-1942
RARITY: Rare
TIMEFRAME: 1935-1936
 
HERDER HERDER
 
Loading German Dagger, please wait
 

( HERDER - Similar To : Generic B & Wingen 2nd )   The differences on German daggers between these three styles of cross-guard is marginal and confusing especially on eagles with little detailing. The body structure on the Herder is slightly more upright than the generic B and there is no dip between upper head and beak. It sometimes will require magnification to be sure. Herder and Wingen also had a preference for nickel plating their German officers daggers which can sometimes be used to differentiate from the Generic B variety.
The Herder, Wingen and Generic B cross-guards, in my opinion are the hardest to distinguish if the dagger is not maker marked.

RARITY: Common
TIMEFRAME: 1936-1942
 
 
HOLLER 1st HOLLER 2nd
 
Loading German Dagger, please wait Loading German Dagger, please wait
 

( HOLLER 1st - Similar To : Alcoso 1st )   As with most early examples this German cross-guard by Holler is normally seen made of a heavy base metal and heavily silver plated. The 1st pattern Holler bears a resemblance to the Alcoso 1st but has a neater crisper design with differences to the head and body shape and subtle differences to the upper leg. Also note the more dramatic rise to the inner spline of the wing, either side of the head, in comparison to the ACS1.
Some early Hollers show a crescent moon tool mark on the head to the right of the eye and is a sure sign of Holler production. Nearly always matched with a slant grip and early 14 leaf pommel. As with most early produced German Army daggers these early Alcoso's are no exception, using quality materials and expertly hand chased, they are every advanced collectors dream.

Courtesy of the V.B. collection.


( HOLLER 2nd - Similar To : E-Pack 3rd, Holler 4th, Weyersburg 3rd )   A scarce and rarely observed cross-guard that originally must have come from the same source as the E-Pack 3rd. Normally seen with a more defined cross pattern to the breast area and a rounder or stubbier look to the head and beak. 
Holler is thought to have used the 2nd style as a transitional part and for a short time only between the 1st and 3rd style crossguard, however they returned to use it again during the late stages of the war. Either example can be considered rare and the easiest way to spot one is the circular punched eye, in comparison with the lazy eye appearance of Pack produced German army daggers. Early Holler examples will normally have the half crescent tool mark to the rear of the head and 3 chisel marks to the neck of the eagle, as well as 2 acorns hand cut to finish off the scabbard bands.
Late war examples of this design by Holler do not have this handwork and should have a generic scabbard.
Courtesy of Ian @ SD

RARITY: Rare
TIMEFRAME: 1935-1936
RARITY: Rare
TIMEFRAME: 1936
 
HOLLER 3rd HOLLER 4th
 
Loading German Dagger, please wait Loading German Dagger, please wait
 

( HOLLER 3rd - Similar To : None )   The 3rd pattern Holler is the most common style observed on German army daggers produced by this manufacturer. The appearance is unique and the detail normally stands up well with little or no wear. The head shape and parrot like beak are a dead give-away as is the broad ^ shaped feathering above the legs. It is not known to have been used by any other manufacturer of German army officers dagger during the 4-5 years that this template was produced, and any dagger displaying this cross-guard, not plain bladed or maker marked Holler should be viewed with caution.
It can be found on daggers with and without a tapered blade tang and some blades display cross-grain running down the central portion of the blade rather than across it, another characteristic unique to Holler.

( HOLLER 4th - Similar To : E-Pack 3rd, Holler 2nd , Weyersburg 3rd )   This 4th and final design from Holler is often confused with both the Holler 2nd and E-Pack 3rd crossguards. Using the same basic design originally produced by Pack there are major differences in the finishing and details to the eagle. Most Hollers will have a circular punched eye ( not always ) and a different cut to the chest pattern weave observed on the Pack 3rd.
 Holler used this pattern twice during the period, the earlier 2nd pattern crossguard from Holler normally displays more defined hand work and chiseling to the birds head and wreath, the later 4th will normally only have a simple circular punched eye, and be fitted with a Generic type scabbard.
 Both the Holler 2nd and 4th can be considered scarce due to the short amount of time that they where in production.

RARITY: Common
TIMEFRAME: 1936-1940
RARITY: Scarce
TIMEFRAME: 1940-1942
 
HORSTER 1st HORSTER 2nd
 
Loading German Dagger, please wait Loading German Dagger, please wait
 

( HORSTER 1st - Similar To : None )   The body appears squat and undersized in comparison with other designs and is normally observed with heavy broad feathering to the chest area, the beak is sharp downward facing, the head is large and close to the top of the guard. The feet almost appear to come straight out from the underside of the body with little evidence of legs, also early Horsters display a raised circular platform beneath the swastika unique to this maker and Klass. This stocky, pronounced eagle normally displays strong detail and holds up well overtime to handling wear even after 60+ years. I am yet to see a flattened worn example. This early offering from Horster can be considered rare.
 One of my personal favorites, crisp and pronounced design, a good representation of an eagle and always found matched with quality base metals and plating.

( HORSTER 2nd - Similar To : Eickhorn 2nd)   The similarities between the Horster 2nd & Eickhorn 2nd are very close indeed as the heads are virtually identical. Look for a shorter neck, more defined chequered patterning to the breast area and the inner wing feathering showing more horizontal on the Horster. This pattern is normally found with a zinc alloy or pot metal cheap base metal and lightly silver plated, and should only be found on later production daggers. Look at the breast pattern to quickly distinguish between this Horster pattern and the Eickhorn 2nd.
 The 2nd  and 3rd pattern Horster's shown in Mr Wittmans excellent Army dagger reference book on page 38/39 are in my opinion a Herder or Wingen ( page 38 ) and a WKC 2nd Transitional ( page 39 ). Horster therefore only produced two cross-guards themselves, both shown above.

RARITY: Rare
TIMEFRAME: 1936
RARITY: Common
TIMEFRAME: 1937-1942
 
KLAAS 1st KLAAS 2nd
 
Loading German Dagger, please wait Loading German Dagger, please wait
 

( KLAAS 1st - Similar To : Klaas 2nd )   While both the 1st and 2nd Klaas cross-guards look similar there are major differences in certain areas for both designs to be considered unique. It is also difficult to establish which pattern was the first one released as both can be found on the earliest slant grip German Army daggers by Klaas and also non-slanted period daggers. Although normally found with heavy hand enhancing and chiseller work to both patterns, there also exists a totally un-enhanced version. ( examples needed ).
 The above pattern normally features a smaller slimmer swastika, smaller swirls to both quillions and non-rounded inner wing splines either side of the eagles head. There is also little evidence of a raised pedestal under the swastika which is normally obvious on the 2nd pattern cross-guard.
The easiest and most reliable method of determining the difference between a Klaas 1st and a Klaas 2nd cross-guard is to count the wing feathering sections on each wing. The 1st will have 5 sections, the later 2nd pattern Klaas displays only four.

 I am looking to setup a page dedicated to Klaas Army daggers, please contact me if you can help with high res pictures featuring either of the above cross-guards.

( KLAAS 2nd - Similar To : Klaas 1st )   Probably the most intricate design encountered on any German army dagger with the exception of some early Pack designs due to the high quality of the hand enhancing. The firm utilized blades with both nickel plating and the polished variety and although the nickel option would have been expensive to produce, the cross-guard base metal was not and often led to lifting of the silver plating.
The polished blades also can be found with the cross-grain running vertically down the blade on the central section, with the side sections showing the normal horizontal direction.
As far as I am aware this practice can only be found on German army daggers by Holler and Klaas. Klaas also utilized the E-Pack cross-guard onto many of its daggers along with the generic B on later examples. This 2nd design differs from the previous pattern by Klaas with rounded inner wing splines either side of the eagles head, larger and flatter quillion swirls and a defined pedestal under the larger and broader swastika. The easiest and most reliable method of determining the difference between a Klaas 1st and a Klaas 2nd cross-guard is to count the wing feathering sections on each wing. The 1st will have 5 sections, the later 2nd pattern Klaas displays only four.

RARITY: Rare
TIMEFRAME: 1935-1936
RARITY: Scarce
TIMEFRAME: 1936-1937
 
 
PLUMACHER SMF
 
 

( PLUMACHER - Similar To : Holler 1st, ACS 1st )  This rare early cross-guard features prominently on initial release German Army Officers daggers from Plumacher and Axt und Hauerfabrik. With similarities in design to both the Alcoso 1st and Holler 1st patterns, there are consistent differences on numerous examples to be able to classify it as a unique design. The majority will have a flat or filed down appearance to the eagles upper head and a short squat beak, the eye of the bird is normally circular punched and on very close inspection, the right wing is normally positioned slightly lower than the left from the upper edge of the cross-guard. The authors opinion is that this cross-guard MAY be a modified mould of the Holler 1st initial release, the proportions, positioning, wing feathering and body shape are very similar albeit with heavy modifications and chiselling work undertaken.
 This pattern cross-guard has been observed with various base metals and plating techniques ranging from early brass based, to light weight alloy. The wing segments nearly always show hand enhancing to each and every section and the outward rounded profile to the eagles chest makes it very susceptible to wear. As far as I am aware this cross-guard should always be matched to a slant grip and matching early parts and fittings.

( SMF - Similar To : None )   The SMF eagle is unique in that it is probably the ugliest of all the birds encountered on period German army daggers. The head is a very unusual shape with a downward turning mouth and a rounded hook beak. The body detailing or feathering normally extends high up the neck area into the head unlike most other cross-guard designs and the very large circular roundels to either quillion are a tell tale sign of this particular pattern cross-guard. The base metal is normally always found to be of inferior quality along with the silver plating and it is very rare to come across this particular German Army dagger cross-guard today that exhibits the detail on the example shown above.
Occasionally it is possible to find this SMF cross-guard with hand enhancing evident but normally only on the very earliest releases bearing quality brass base metals.

Rare as a design but not one of the prettiest.

RARITY: Rare
TIMEFRAME: 1935
RARITY: Scarce
TIMEFRAME: 1935
 
WKC 1st WKC 2nd
 
Loading German Dagger, please wait Loading German Dagger, please wait
 

( WKC 1st - Similar To : None )   This early guard is sometimes but not always found with detailed hand enhancing, the upper head and brow area are almost square in appearance with a small sharply downward nose like beak. The half crescent moon eye is another feature typical of the 1st WKC and a squat short body to the eagle. Although not obvious from the above picture, the wings of the eagle are very slender in appearance compared to other manufacturers and this design can be found on many early German army daggers by various companies.
The design itself is normally matched to the earliest WKC dagger fittings and a slant grip although many examples also exist with a mixture of parts assembled from firms who purchased from various sources and assembled to order.  The WKC 1st and Pack 1st where favored designs from the start of production in 1935 including many of the smaller cottage makers. Easily distinguishable by its unique design and proportions and quality base metals and enhancements, it is one of the most prolific patterns of cross-guards found on early pre-1936 German army daggers.
 Rated as common, it must be said that NO early slant gripped dagger can be classed as prolific due to the limited amount of time that they were in production, however in comparison to other early cross-guards it was hard to rate this one any differently.

( WKC 2nd- Similar To : E-Pack 3rd, WKC 3rd, Weyersburg 2nd)   Only four or five examples of this extremely rare pattern cross-guard have been observed since this page was constructed and all cross-guards came matched to WKC marked blades and corresponding hilt fittings. It would have been a transitional or experimental casting in my opinion, used for only a very short period in 1936.
 Consisting of high quality base metals and plating techniques, it is normally found with a tapered tang blade and married with a non-slanted type grip. The pattern also normally exhibits hand chiseling or enhancing to the leg, wreath and feet areas and with special attention given to the head definition. The lazy eye and beak shape as well as the stippling detail behind the swastika are traits normally associated with the Paul Weyersburg factory enhanced cross-guards and there is no doubt in my mind that there was some form of collaboration between the companies or shared workers that resulted in this hybrid design, especially as they both shared the Weyersburg name. Paul Weyersburg were not successful in 1936 in securing a manufacturing contract for German army daggers, did WKC poach some staff maybe?.
 Considering that WKC was one of the largest producers or German army daggers throughout the period, the limited examples known to exist today bearing this very rare cross-guard is surprising.
 
Courtesy of the Peter.P collection.

RARITY: Common
TIMEFRAME: 1935-1936
RARITY: Rare+
TIMEFRAME: 1936
 
WKC 3rd WKC 4th
 
Loading German Dagger, please wait Loading German Dagger, please wait
 
( WKC 3rd - Similar To : WKC 2nd )   The 3rd WKC can also be classed as scarce although it was more prolific than the previous cross-guard. Normally found with slightly inferior base metals and little or no enhancing, would suggest that this design was later in the production order from WKC than the previous design. It can be found matched to tapered and non-tapered tang dagger blades and normally with the later type B non-slant grips. On close inspection and disregarding the head, comparing the previous design, you can see the similarities in body shape, wing and feathering alignment, wreath and swastika proportions and quillion shape and size are all very similar. Also note the slight feathering flaw on both designs above the birds right leg.
 The head on this pattern is a huge contrast to the following tomahawk styled eagle, with a simple circular punched eye, rounded forehead and beak and usually found totally un-enhanced, it also bears little resemblance to the previous 2nd design. Although classified as scare due to the amount of time it was in production, various other companies also made use of it, purchasing directly from WKC, including Voos, Puma, Horster and Klaas.
WKC was also one of only two manufacturers to feature five (5) individual wing feather sections to either wing, ( 4th pattern the exception ) most others makers only exhibit four clear sections.
( WKC 4th - Similar To : Generic type A )   Easily confused with the generic type "A", this design can be distinguished by the square profile of the head and beak without the drop from forehead to beak. Along with Eickhorn, this manufacturer produced huge quantities of army daggers, and this particular crossguard was utilized from 1936 - 1942. As such it can be found with a variety of base metals and finishes varying from tapered tang blades on early examples, right through until the pot metal and plaster filled white gripped examples, produced late in the war. It is probably the most prolific design with the exception of the Generic type cross-guards.
 Unusually there are few similarities between three out of the four patterns used by WKC and they do not appear to have used and modified existing moulds as can be seen when looking at the Eickhorn cross-guard progression for example. It is also interesting to note that this final pattern, with the exception of the flat head to the eagle is very similar to the Generic type A. My personal opinion is that WKC either had a design approved to be used as the Generic version for standardized production or may indeed have actually been the manufacturer, likewise Wingen or Herder for the Generic B.
RARITY: Scarce
TIMEFRAME: 1936
RARITY: Common
TIMEFRAME: 1936-1942
 
WEYERSBERG 1st WEYERSBERG 2nd
 
Loading German Dagger, please wait Loading German Dagger, please wait
 

( WEYERSBERG 1st - Similar To : WKC 1st )   The Weyersberg eagle is very scarce and should only been seen on early period manufactured army daggers by this maker. The head appears slightly oversized in proportion to the square sided body which normally has a coarse hand enhanced chequered patterning. The head features, eye and mouth are exquisite and highly detailed and most examples show a unique stippling to the background behind the swastika.
Weyersberg used the WKC 1st crossguard on their initial 200 dagger introduction in 1935 ( all internally numbered ) before switching to an in house modified design of the same cross-guard shown above. This design can also be found on non-slant grip daggers early in the period, although it is thought Weyersberg ceased army dagger production in 1936 to focus on alternative edged weapon manufacture.

( WEYERSBERG 2nd - Similar To : E-Pack 3rd )   This is the slightly later and last design by Weyersberg thought to be from 1935/6 and is a modified E-Pack 3rd cross-guard. The head is slightly larger than the Pack with the typical lazy eye and up-turned mouth of the 1st Weyersberg design. Also note the background stippling behind the swastika evident on both examples shown here. This particular design on non-slant gripped daggers is unusually considered to be more scarce than its earlier predecessors purely because of the limited timeframe it was in production. The large prominent half crescent shaped eye and hooked mouth to the eagles head are typical of Paul Weyersburg production, the firm itself was unsuccessful in securing a manufacturing contract in 1936, switching instead to mainly Luftwaffe requirements so all examples will be early and fitted with quality materials and base metals, many with extensive hand chasing.
 This particular pattern is normally found matched with the later type B style grip.

RARITY: Scarce
TIMEFRAME: 1935-1936
RARITY: Rare
TIMEFRAME: 1936
 
WINGEN 1st WINGEN 2nd
 
Loading German Dagger, please wait Loading German Dagger, please wait
 

( WINGEN 1st - Similar To : None )   Finally an example of this rare in house Wingen manufactured cross-guard that actually shows some detail to the eagle. Nearly all examples will show virtually zero head or eye detail, poor breast work definition and an undefined swastika and wreath. This is probably due to the fact that this pattern cross-guard is nearly always found cast with a soft brass base metal and was highly prone to wear and tear or maybe a combination of poorly defined mould and materials. These initial Wingen army daggers can be found normally matched with a slant grip although non-slant examples do exist. They also used unique in house pommels and bevelled unique scabbard bands married to this cross-guard.
 Wingen went on to produce a relatively large amount of German army officers daggers later in the period, however these initial Wingen entrants are far from common and this cross-guard should only be found on Wingen marked daggers.
 The firm also in many cases cast a "W" onto the daggers blade tang hidden under the grip. Note the casting flaw to the feathering on the left wing end section evident on ALL.

Courtesy of the S.Keltner collection.

( WINGEN 2nd - Similar To : Herder & Generic B )   More like the Herder in design but with a more squat body and a slight dip between brow and beak. The beak appears with less of a "snarl" than both the generic and Herder designs and with straighter edges to the body sides than the generic B.
All 3 can be considered unique designs but the differences are marginal. The Herder and Wingen designs are often found with nickel silvered fittings and as such are far less prone to wear and loss of plating. The above example is silver plated.
 It is the authors opinion that the later Generic B mass produced cross-guard was based on this design by Wingen, maybe even produced by them.

RARITY: Rare
TIMEFRAME: 1935-1936
RARITY: Common
TIMEFRAME: 1936-1942
 
 
  
   The lower section shows German Army dagger cross-guard patterns as yet to be positively identified or tied to a specific manufacturer. I have however listed the possible makers based on known trademarked examples and other traits such as the configuration of other dagger parts, pommel and scabbard etc. It is also possible to look at the supplier of parts on later trademarked daggers by the same maker to pinpoint a base cross-guard source or at least be able to offer an educated guess as to the manufacturer. All cross-guards shown below can be classed as rare and more examples are needed for my database in order to accurately attribute a manufacturer.  
 
UNATTRIBUTED - KLAAS / VOOS UNATTRIBUTED - PUMA / VOOS
 
   

( UNATTRIBUTED - Similar To : Wingen 1st, Klaas )  Only four examples of this heavily enhanced design have so far been observed, three fitted to Voos German army daggers and one to a Klaas. Bearing similarities to both Wingen and Klaas early production cross-guards, my initial gut instinct is to say that this is probably a Klaas variant based on the general appearance and enhancement.
  There is also a possibility that this cross-guard is totally unique to Voos, possibly purchased from Klaas or Wingen and heavily adapted and enhanced. As it stands, this pattern can be classed as unique, the toughest of all cross-guards to find for the type collector and as rare as they get in terms of known examples.

 Note the massively oversized wreath and swastika and the unique ribbon enhancement to the wreath at 3 & 9 o'clock.

Courtesy of the T.K. collection.

( UNATTRIBUTED - Similar To : Klaas 2nd )  Found with heavy hand chiseling and only on early army daggers, this design has been observed on German army daggers manufactured by Puma, Voos, Wusthof and Krebs. Now that more examples of this cross-guard have come to light and the identical consistent wing feathering hand enhancement, I am fairly confident of this cross-guard being a Puma or Voos manufactured early contribution.
   It MAY have been purchased from another unknown manufacturer and extensively modified to Puma's or Voos standards but the level of alteration has disguised the base details to the extent that no confident comparison can be made to other known manufacturers. There is also the chance that this pattern or design is unique and manufactured in house by either the Voos or Puma company. It can be classed as extremely scarce. Strangely both unattributed cross-guards are found on Voos German army daggers.

Courtesy of the T.K. collection.
RARITY: Rare+
TIMEFRAME: 1935-1936
RARITY: Rare
TIMEFRAME: 1935-1936
UNATTRIBUTED - UNKNOWN UNATTRIBUTED - PUMA / VOOS
 
 
   

( UNATTRIBUTED - Similar To : E-Pack 1st )   This variation has been observed on early German army daggers by Max Weyersburg, Horster, Klaas, Wingen and Tiger, it bears similarities to the 1st cross-guard produced by Ernst Pack with identical feathering shape and the tell tale large quarter circular rise to the wings either side of the birds head. The wreath, head position and swirls all conform however the proportions of the eagle itself, size and shape of the body, a small poorly defined swastika, all point towards a variation probably altered and enhanced by one of the above manufacturers. The examples to date have all displayed poor definition, with little or no head detailing and worn raised areas,
this may just be a combination of brass base metals and early production however it could also be by design. The chiseling to the breast feathering on the example posted above is also typical of the type of work found on Pack 1sts. More examples of this cross-guard are required.

Courtesy of the Janos Z collection.


RARITY: Rare+
TIMEFRAME: 1935
 
 
 
Some of our services include the following:  
- We do offer a consignment service, offering and displaying your authentic
military items on wardaggers.com, please see terms and
conditions for more information.                  
- Collector website construction, from single page gallery based blogs to
three, five or seven page websites. Contact for details.
- Free valuation and assessment of your German Military items to the best
of our knowledge.

 
 

Zoom

Zoom or Macro Feature - Mouse-over
- This website uses a zoom feature that requires a Java enabled
browser or in some cases the user to allow active content to be
displayed. Right click on the yellow toolbar located at the top of
the Explorer page and "Allow Blocked Content".
Simply hover your cursor over the image to the left for a working
example.
 
 
 
wardaggers.com © 2010 | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use
Designed by: Elegant adapted by wardaggers.com